Search the Collection
Advanced Search

A half-block model of the South Australian trading ketch MORNING STAR

Date: c 1859
Dimensions:
Overall: 264 x 1091 x 145 mm, 7700 g
Other (half-block model): 105 x 908 x 139 mm
Medium: Wood
Credit Line: ANMM Collection
Classification:Models
Object Name: Half block model
Object No: 00045968

User Terms

    Description
    A half-block model of the South Australian trading ketch MORNING STAR, circa 1859, believed to be the builder's model. The hull is built up of timber layers (bread and butter construction) alternating light and dark timber. The model is fixed to a backing board. A brass plaque, engraved MORNING STAR/PORT ADELAIDE/1857, was probably added at a later date.

    The MORNING STAR was one- masted with cutter rig, 35.4 feet long (10.8 metres) built at Port Adelaide in 1859. It was wrecked at Glenelg on 16 November 1923. It was part of the fleet of ketches and other small vessels known as the Mosquito Fleet or Ketch Fleet which served the southern coasts of South Australia from the mid-1800s to the 1960s.

    SignificanceThe model represents the South Australian fleet of trading ketches which were an important element in South Australian maritime history, surviving well into the 20th century - the last sailing cargo vessels around the Australian coasts. The model is also significant in representing the orginal form of one of these vessels built in South Australia, because there are few records of building these small vessels, many were built elsewhere, and most changed their rig and configuration over the years.

    HistoryThe MORNING STAR was a part of the fleet of ketches and other small sailing vessels known as the Mosquito Fleet or Ketch Fleet which carried cargo round South Australia's coasts from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s. They were known collectively as ketches, but included cutters and schooners and often changed their rig. They were the last surviving cargo vessels under sail around Australia's coasts. They carried cargoes between city and country - farm products, grains, minerals, groceries, and machinery, plying between the the jetties which dotted the shallow waters of the southern coast. By the 1950s road transport was taking over from them and by 1960 there were only about 20 left. The last active trading ketches served Kangaroo Island from Port Adelaide until 1982.

    Builder's models of this period were used as a step in the construction, providing a pattern from which the lines of the full scale vessel were drawn out on the floor of the builder's shop.

    Discuss this Object

    Comments

    Please log in to add a comment.