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Bell from SS LURLINE

Date: 1932
Dimensions:
Overall: 397 x 379 mm, 40 kg (14.89 in, 88.18 lb)
Medium: Cast copper alloy, iron
Credit Line: ANMM Collection Gift from Kerry and John Snelgrove
Classification:Vessels and fittings
Object Name: Ship's bell
Object No: 00046731

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    Description
    The Lurline was one of three identical vessels built for the Matson Line. It was one of the most luxurious ships afloat at the time. Lurline was a popular vessel for those cruising the Pacific in the years proceeding WWII. The ship played a significant role as a troop transport and later carrying war brides from Australia to America.
    SignificanceIn World War II the ship was assigned to the U.S. Navy for use as a transport and sailed around the globe carrying thousands of troops. The vessel called into Sydney on many occcasions. Lurline once transported Prime Minister John Curtin to America for a meeting with President Roosevelt. After the war the Lurline was used to transport Australian war brides from Sydney to San Francisco.
    HistoryLURLINE (III) was a Matson Line vessel built by Bethlehem Shipyard at Quincy, Mass, USA and launched in 1932. It catered for 475 first class and 240 tourist class passengers. It carried a crew of 359.

    Launched by Mrs. William P. Roth, wife of president of Matson Navigation company on 18 July 1932, the ship was delivered 5 January 1933 with a maiden voyage from New York to San Francisco-Los Angeles-South Seas and Oriental cruise. The standard service route was San Francisco-Los Angeles-Honolulu.

    In World War II the ship was assigned to the U.S. Navy for use as a transport and sailed around the globe carrying thousands of troops. After the war the Lurline was used to transport Australian war brides from Sydney to San Francisco. The ship was returned to Matson Line in May 1946, reconverted to a luxury liner at United Engineering in Alameda, California and re-entered the San Franscisco-Los Angeles-Honolulu service.

    Turbine damage at Los Angeles in 1963 forced the ship out of commission and it was put up for sale.

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