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Broadsheet ballads titled 'The Canadian Boat Song' and 'The Banks of the Blue Moselle'.

Date: 1828 - 1832
Dimensions:
Overall: 255 x 104 mm, 0.019 kg
Medium: Woodcut and printed text on paper mounted on card
Credit Line: ANMM Collection
Classification:Ephemera
Object Name: Broadsheet
Object No: 00031092
Place Manufactured:London

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    Description
    Broadsheet ballads titled 'The Canadian Boat Song' and 'The Banks of the Blue Moselle'.
    'The banks of the Blue Moselle' was written by Edward Fitzball and traditionally sung to music composed and arranged by George Herbert Rodwell. It refers to the Moselle River that flows through France, Germany and Luxembourg.
    SignificanceBroadsheets were designed as printed ephemera to be published and distributed rapidly. This also meant they were quickly disposed of with many of them not surviving the test of time. The museum's broadsheet collection is therefore a rare and valuable example of how maritime history was communicated to a wide audience, particularly in the 18th and 19th centuries. They vibrantly illustrate many of the themes and myths surrounding life at sea. Some of them also detail stories about transportation, migration.
    HistoryTHE CANADIAN BOAT SONG.

    Faintly as tolls the evening chime,
    Our voices keep tune and our oars beat time;
    Soon as the woods on shore look dim,
    We'll sing at St. Ann's our parting hymn.

    Row brothers, row -- the stream runs fast,
    The rapids are near, and the daylight's past.

    Why should we yet our sails unfurl?
    There's not a breath in the blue wave to curl;
    But when the wind blows off the shore,
    Oh; sweetly we'd rest our weary oar.

    Blow breeze, blow -- the stream runs fast,
    The rapids are near, and the daylights pst.

    Uttawa tide, this trembling moon
    Shall see us float o'er thy surges soon!
    Saint of this green isle, hear our prayer,
    Grant us cool heav'ns and fav'ring air!

    Blow, breeze blow -- the stream runs fast,
    The rapids are near, and the daylights past.


    THE BANKS OF THE BLUE MOSELLE.

    When the glow-worm gilds the elfin bower,
    That clings around the ruin'd shrine,
    Where first we met, where first we lov'd,
    And I confess'd me thine:
    'Tis there I'll fly to meet thee still,
    At sound of vesper bell:
    In the starry light of the summer night,
    On the banks of the blue Moselle.

    If the cares of life should shade my brow,
    Yes, yes, in our native bowers:
    My lute and harp might best accord
    To tell of happier hours:
    'Tis there I'd soothe thy grief to rest,
    each sigh of sorrow quell:
    In the starry light of the summer night,
    On the banks of the blue Moselle.


    Broadsides were issued by a number of London publishers for selling by hawkers on the street and were a popular form of entertainment in 18th and 19th century England. By their very nature they are extremely fragile and ephemeral ;as a result they are notably scarce in good condition .
    They were also known as 'roadsheet’, 'broadsheet', ‘stall’, ‘vulgar’ or ‘come all ye’ ballads'. In the 19th century many ballads were written about people emigrating. A large number to escape the difficult economic conditions they faced or to try and make their fortunes to bring home.The ballads reflect a deep love of their home place and in many cases the hero - usually male – is pining for a loved one he had to leave behind.

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