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Reproduced courtesy of Jimmy K Thaiday

Kab Kar footage and audio recording

Date: 2013
Medium: Digital data, carrier: DVD
Credit Line: ANMM Collection Purchased with funds from the Sid Faithfull and Christine Sadler program supporting Contemporary Indigenous Maritime Heritage in Far North Queensland and the Torres Strait Islands through the ANM Foundation
Object Copyright: © Jimmy K Thaiday
Classification:Visual communication
Object Name: Recording
Object No: 00054280

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    Description
    Footage and audio recording for Kab Kar-from then till now
    SignificanceThe Daris are bought to life using a montage of projected video image and sound over surface. The mirrored image reflects traditional culture through present day technology and interpretation of materials. The Daris constructed in ghostnet (discarded fishing net) demonstartes the underlying message of developing new ideas from traditional values.
    The use of vision allows the viewer to experience the Dari less as an object and more as part of the cultural life of the Torres Straits.
    The artist has mounted two Daris as the dancers usually move in pairs, the use of the mirrior reflects traditional culture through the present generation.
    HistoryThe piece, Kab Kar-from then till now was a finalist in the 30th Telstra Indigenous Art Awards 2013 and the piece won a highly commended award.
    Dari-headdress traditionally made from cane and feathers are worn by Torres Strait Island men, variations on it's design identified people by island and clan groups.
    As light footed dancers skip from one foot to the other, their heads turn and tilt flicking the feathers of their traditional headdresses in a powerful demonstration of strength, agility and practiced control. During times of celebration, these dances often go late into the night and the rhythmic beating of the drums, singing and rising dust from the sand dance ground is mesmerising and deeply spiritual.
    The artist has mounted two Daris as the dancers usually move in pairs, the use of the mirrior reflects traditional culture through present generation.
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