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Ring from HM(A)S Fantome

Date: 1900s
Dimensions:
Overall: 305 mm
Medium: Brass
Credit Line: ANMM Collection Gift from Sara Powter
Classification:Tools and equipment
Object Name: Ring
Object No: 00054375
Related Place:Liverpool, Glasgow, Newcastle upon Tyne, Belfast, London,

User Terms

    Description
    A ship's telegraph; manufactured by Chadburn & Son (Liverpool) Brass pedestal (ship's) telegraphs were used for communicating orders regarding a ship's speed between the wheelhouse or bridge and the engine room. The operator could select between 'Full' speed, 'Half' speed, 'Slow' speed or 'Stop' and 'Standby'; these selections applied to two directions: 'Ahead' and 'Astern'.

    Chadburn's used an attractive graphics lay-out and style on the telegraph's dial, which by and large became the accepted standard because it was widely copied by other manufacturers. In order to distinguish an original 'Chadburn' - an often used generic term for a ship's telegraph - from other means of (ship to shore) communication, i.e. morse code and 'marconi wireless' telegraphy, a change was considered essential and Chadburn & Son traded with the word ' Ship ' added.
    SignificanceA ship's telegraph; manufactured by Chadburn & Son (Liverpool) Brass pedestal (ship's) telegraphs were used for communicating orders regarding a ship's speed between the wheelhouse or bridge and the engine room.

    Chadburn's used an attractive graphics lay-out and style on the telegraph's dial, which more or less became the accepted standard for other manufacturers and was widely copied. In order to distinguish an original 'Chadburn' - an often used generic term for a ship's telegraph - from other means of ship to shore communication, i.e. morse code and 'marconi wireless' telegraphy, a change was considered essential and the business traded with the word ' Ship ' added.
    HistoryThe Royal Navy maintained a large number of sloops designed for overseas service and powered by both steam and sail. By the turn of the century however, their number had dwindled, FANTOME being one of the last group built for that purpose.

    Built by Sheerness Dockyard, HMS FANTOME was launched on 23rd March 1901. Her displacement was 1,070 tons, length 185 feet, beam 33 feet and a draught of 11 feet 3 inches. A twin screw ship of 1,400 ihp, her designed speed was 13.25 knots.

    HMS FANTOME arrived in Australian waters in 1907 to take over surveying duties from HMS PENGUIN. The FANTOME carried the survey service livery of a white hull and a buff funnel. Her main armament was removed, the vessel mounting only a single 3 pounder. She remained on surveying duties until 1914, when she was taken over by the RAN, at the request of the Admiralty, to be re-armed for war duties.

    On 27th November 1914 she was commissioned as an Australian ship. As the Admiralty had plans to bolster the RN's presence in the Bay of Bengal area, another Royal Navy ship, HMS PSYCHE, was brought into RAN service for hydrographic purposes; the FANTOME was earmarked for the Gulf of Aden area. However, orders were changed and both PSYCHE and FANTOME went to the Bay of Bengal.

    On 27th July 1915 the FANTOME was commissioned for full wartime duties under the command of Acting-Commander L.T. Jones, RN. Departing Sydney on 15th August 1915, FANTOME sailed north, not returning to Sydney until September 1917.

    After a refit, the ship went back into service as a patrol vessel, her one extraordinary service on this duty was a punitive raid on Malekula in the New Hebrides in October 1918.

    In April 1920 FANTOME was recommissioned as an RN Ship in Sydney, and returned to pre-war surveying duties. She carried on in this role until she was paid off for disposal on 27th April 1925. In 1925 she was sold out of service for scrapping. Her hull was stripped bare and was used as a barge, mainly in Tasmania, until she was sold for demolition in 1956.





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