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The RODONDO Schottische

Date: c 1878
Dimensions:
Overall: 322 x 250 mm, 0.03 kg
Medium: Ink on paper
Credit Line: ANMM Collection
Classification:Ephemera
Object Name: Sheet music
Object No: 00027128
Place Manufactured:Sydney

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    Description
    This sheet music consists of a semi-circle lithograph of the steamship RODONDO, shown from its portside at sea. Dedicated to Captain R J Clark it features his portrait below an image of the vessel. The sale of sheet music was popular in 19th century Australia with many families, who played music in their homes or heard it at recitals, concerts and balls.
    Significance'The Rodondo Schottische' demonstrates the production of sheet music to commemorate and promote ships active on the Australian trade route in the late 19th century.
    HistorySheet music offers an insight into popular culture and social values at the time of their production. The widely distributed pieces were sold fairly cheaply, making them popular with the general public. Music was an integral part of people's social life in the home and at public events such as balls, recitals, concerts and theatre shows. The Schottische was a popular dance in the mid and late-19th century ballrooms, combining elements of Scottish dance with the German Polka.

    By the mid-19th century many middle class families owned a piano, an important part of their social entertainment and recreation at home. Music sheets featuring waltzes, quadrilles, galops, polkas and mazurkas were everyday favourites, covering a range of themes including travel, plays and literature. The launch or arrival of a ship was a common reason for composing a piece.

    RODONDO was an iron screw steamship of 917 tons built at Liverpool, England in 1879. It was used on the Australian trade route in the late 19th century. In 1879 RODONDO was under the command of Captain John L Clark.


    Additional Titles

    Web title: The RODONDO Schottische

    Primary title: The RODONDO Schottische

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