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Broadsheet featuring the ballads 'Far, Far Upon the Sea' and 'The Unlucky Fellow'.

Date: 1845 - 1849
Dimensions:
Overall: 253 x 193 mm, 0.023 kg
Medium: Woodcut engraving and printed text on paper mounted on card.
Credit Line: ANMM Collection
Classification:Ephemera
Object Name: Broadsheet
Object No: 00017398
Place Manufactured:London

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    Description
    Broadsheet featuring the ballads 'Far, Far Upon the Sea' and 'The Unlucky Fellow'.
    SignificanceBroadsheets were designed as printed ephemera to be published and distributed rapidly. This also meant they were quickly disposed of with many of them not surviving the test of time. The museum's broadsheet collection is therefore a rare and valuable example of how maritime history was communicated to a wide audience, particularly in the 18th and 19th centuries. They vibrantly illustrate many of the themes and myths surrounding life at sea. Some of them also detail stories about transportation and migration.
    HistoryTHE UNLUCKY FELLOW.

    Is there any one here has got a desire,
    To wed with a grumbling wife,
    He'd better by far put his head in the fire,
    And at once put an end to his life.
    For I marrried one and I thought her a dove,
    But I very soon wished myself dead,
    For in a week's time she got tired of love,
    And pull'd all the hair off my head,
    Oh.dear, oh, dear,
    My heart is so full, that I'm ready to cry
    Oh what an unfortunate fellow am I.

    The first sad mishap filld my eyes full of tears,
    She brought me home children two
    And said you must father these two little dears,
    Said I, I'll be d---- if I do,
    She said with a sneer how dare I presume
    To think of my case being hard,
    Then she knock'd me down stairs with a broom
    And bolted me out of the yard.

    But much worse than that is the next if you mark,
    I thought it would make me run wild,
    When I trod upon our cat's tail in the dark,
    He mollrowed and awoke the young child
    She up with her fist which put me in fright,
    Then swore she'd make me rue it,
    So she made me go sleep in the cupboard all night
    Though I said I did not go to it.

    On the very next morning indeed it is true,
    I met with a shocking loss
    She said you go buy some meat for a stew,
    I will love but don't you be cross,
    But oh, what ill luck in this world we oft find,
    Before I could get home to her,
    A large new foundland dog come smelling behind
    And stole it all off the skewer,

    So when I got home all trouble and fear
    Oh, how I did shiver and shake,
    Said I, I've met with an accident dear
    A large dog's run away wit the steak,
    If you'd been there you'd have pitied my sorrow
    My had she pummell'd with blows
    And said Mr. Cox I shall leave you tomorrow,
    Then pulled me about by the nose.

    My wife on Saturday night goes oh dear
    To the place where my wages I take
    She won't even allow me a pint of small beer
    And with hunger and cold I oft shake
    Then the young ones she makes me take out for a walk
    Or drag them about in a shay,
    And often I bring them home squalling, oh lauk,
    And then there's the devil to pay, oh dear
    I'm blow'd up each day, so my brains out I'll blow
    That certainly will put an end to my woe.

    FAR, FAR UPON THE SEA.

    Far, far upon the sea,
    The good ship speeding free,
    Upon the deck we gather young and old,
    And view the flapping sail,
    Swelling out before the gale,
    Full and round without a wrinkle or fold,
    Or watch the waves that glide,
    By the vessel's stately side,
    Or e wild sea birds that follow thro' the air
    Or we gather in a ring,
    And with cheerful voices sing,
    Oh, gaily goes the ship when the wind blows fair
    Far, far upon the sea,
    The good ship speeding free,
    We watch the sea birdt follow thro' the air,
    Or we gather in a ring,
    And with cheerful voices sing,
    Oh, gaily goes the ship when the wind blows fair.

    Far, far upon the sea,
    With the sunshine on your lee,
    We talk of pleasent days when we were young;
    Aud remember, tho' we roam,
    The sweet melodies of home,
    The songs of happy childhood which we sung;
    And tho' we quit her shore,
    To return to it no more,
    Sound the glories that Britannia yet shall hear,
    That Briton rule the waves,
    And never will be slaves,
    Oh, gaily goes the ship when the wind blows fair,
    Far, far upon the sea,
    With the sunshine on our lee,
    Sound the glories that Britannia still shall hear
    That Britons rules the waves,
    And never shall be slaves,
    Oh, gaily goes the ship when the wind blows fair.

    Far, far upon the sea,
    Whate'ee our country be,
    The thought of it shall cheer us as we go,
    And Scotland's sons shall join,
    In the song of Auld Lang Syne,
    With voice by mem'ry softened, clear and low;
    And the men of Erin's Isle,
    Battling sorrow with a smile,
    Shall sing St.Patrick's Morning void of care,
    And thus we pass the day,
    As we journey on our way,
    Oh, gaily goes the ship when the wind blows fair
    Far, far upon the sea,
    Whate'er our country be,
    We'll sing our native music void of care,
    And thus we pass the day,
    As we journey on our way,
    Oh, gaily goes the ship when the wind {blows fair}

    Broadsheets or broadsides, as they were also known, were originally used to communicate official or royal decrees. They were printed on one side of paper and became a popular medium of communication between the 16th and 19th centuries in Europe, particularly Britain. They were able to be printed quickly and cheaply and were widely distributed in public spaces including churches, taverns and town squares.

    The cheap nature of the broadside and its wide accessibility meant that its intended audience were often literate individuals but from varying social standings. The illiterate may have also had access to this literature as many of the ballads were designed to be read aloud.



    The ballads also covered a wide range of subject matter such as witchcraft, epic war battles, murder and maritime themes and events. They were suitably dramatic and often entertaining, but occasionally they were designed as elaborate cautionary tales for those contemplating a life of crime.

    The broadside ballads in the museum's collection were issued by a range of London printers and publishers for sale on the streets by hawkers. They convey, often comically, stories about love, death, shipwrecks, convicts and pirates. Each ballad communicates a sense that these stories were designed to be read aloud for all to enjoy, whether it was at the local tavern or a private residence.
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