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Clipper ship QUEEN OF CLIPPERS

Date: c 1853
Dimensions:
Overall: 289 x 366 mm, 0.25 kg
Medium: Ink on paper
Credit Line: ANMM Collection Purchased with USA Bicentennial Gift funds
Classification:Art
Object Name: Lithograph
Object No: 00004358
Place Manufactured:New York

User Terms

    Description
    This hand coloured lithograph depicts a portrait of the American ship QUEEN OF CLIPPERS sailing at sea with its sails furled and reefed. Between the period of 1845 and 1875 America led the world in clipper ship design. These fast and sleek ships were fundamental to the expanding global economy. Often ship owners and Captains would commemorate their vessel by commissioning a portrait of the ship.
    SignificanceThis lithograph represents the production of ship portraits during the 19th century. It highlights the design of clipper ships and their presence on the world’s oceans at the time.
    HistoryThe era of the clipper ships occurred between 1845 and 1875. The period was dominated by a sense of romance, competition, national pride and innovative technology. The sleek and graceful ships were a symbol of American modernity and fundamental to the expanding global economy. Their design concentrated on speed instead of cargo capacity, a great benefit for shipping companies eager to transport goods quickly.

    The QUEEN OF CLIPPERS was launched in 1853 and built by Robert E Jackson at Boston, Massachusetts. The vessel was originally owned by Seccomb and Taylor of Boston and then sold to Zerega & Co soon after its launch. QUEEN OF CLIPPERS was active on the trade route between New York and San Francisco during the time of the American and Australian gold rush. It is believed to have been renamed REINA DES CLIPPERS after it was sold to French interests in 1856.
    Additional Titles

    Primary title: CLIPPER SHIP QUEEN OF CLIPPERS. PUBLISHED BY N CURRIER.

    Web title: Clipper ship QUEEN OF CLIPPERS

    Related People
    Lithographer: Nathaniel Currier

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